artcomesfirst:

Tuareg inspired

artcomesfirst:

Tuareg inspired

(Source: nativethoughts, via theeducatedfieldnegro)

The total number of Arab immigrants admitted to the United States between 1899 and 1907 was 41,404, and 15,000 more arrived in the following three years. Few of those later arrivals, however, ended up in Little Syria.

One who did not [stay] was Salom Rizk. Arriving from the quiet Syrian village of Ain Arab in 1925, he took one look at the city and bought a ticket on the first train to Sioux City, Iowa. “New York was overwhelming,” he wrote, “an unbelievable jumble of swiftness and bigness—millions of people, millions of cars, buildings, windows, lights, noises—a great mass of vagueness swimming and spinning in my eyes.”

But those who stayed made Little Syria famous. A New York Times writer visited in 1899, marveling at the merchandise of the many peddling emporia, as well as Abrahim Sahadi’s grocery, founded there in 1895. Invoking the metaphor of Aladdin’s cave, the reporter was awed by swords and lamps hanging from the ceiling, glass bracelets of many colors and narghiles with their “fixings,” yet disappointed to find “no langourous eyes nor red fezzes.”

From top: Tailors, dry goods merchants and even entertainers were among the many who found niches in and around Little Syria.

Fom a nice little piece on late 19th/early 20th century Arab-Americans in ”Little Syria,” New York.

seasidecrooning:

nevver:

Peanuts

my entire writing process.

It really is.

seasidecrooning:

nevver:

Peanuts

my entire writing process.

It really is.

(via theconflictedromantic)


With independence in 1962, ethnology and anthropology were banned, as it was felt that they had contributed to the control of Algeria by France, who had sought to ‘divide and rule’ the population. In this vein, the new Algerian government abolished the chair of Berber studies at the University of Algiers. Conscious that this would mean a downgrading of Berber identity, Mammeri took on the mantle and, pro-bono, taught at the University for almost six years on the theme of Berber culture and identity. However, the Algerian government was seeking to create a new myth of a nationally and ethnically homogenous people. Mammeri recognized that this would dilute the Berber people, and so fought against it from within.

Read more here.

With independence in 1962, ethnology and anthropology were banned, as it was felt that they had contributed to the control of Algeria by France, who had sought to ‘divide and rule’ the population. In this vein, the new Algerian government abolished the chair of Berber studies at the University of Algiers. Conscious that this would mean a downgrading of Berber identity, Mammeri took on the mantle and, pro-bono, taught at the University for almost six years on the theme of Berber culture and identity. However, the Algerian government was seeking to create a new myth of a nationally and ethnically homogenous people. Mammeri recognized that this would dilute the Berber people, and so fought against it from within.

Read more here.

I love this man.

I love this man.

(via tarrad7in-deactivated20140508)

El Ali is a whole space – we will have artisanal art downstairs – it is not open yet. We have arranged the walls so that they can accept art photography and painting exhibits. Then there is an ambiance with the Malouf music. We play references like Anouar Brahem, that go well with the environment [of El Ali]. We offer a library that is accessible to all, with books on the history of old Tunis, the history of Tunis. But we also have decoration and culinary magazines, and the brochures and flyers of our clients who use the libraries. We also make available musical instruments.

El Ali is a whole space – we will have artisanal art downstairs – it is not open yet. We have arranged the walls so that they can accept art photography and painting exhibits. Then there is an ambiance with the Malouf music. We play references like Anouar Brahem, that go well with the environment [of El Ali]. We offer a library that is accessible to all, with books on the history of old Tunis, the history of Tunis. But we also have decoration and culinary magazines, and the brochures and flyers of our clients who use the libraries. We also make available musical instruments.

mon-b:

Edward Said & his sister, Palestine 1940

mon-b:

Edward Said & his sister, Palestine 1940

(Source: monsandroses, via thearabzy-deactivated20131029)

(Source: vimeo.com, via billcotter-deactivated20130804)

Sebrata, Libya: Sofia Loren filming a scene from Legends of the Fall with John Wayne at Leptis Magna.

Sebrata, Libya: Sofia Loren filming a scene from Legends of the Fall with John Wayne at Leptis Magna.

mon-b:

polaroidsisahobby:

محمود دويش وإدوارد سعيد


#AwesomePeopleHangingOutTogether

mon-b:

polaroidsisahobby:

محمود دويش وإدوارد سعيد

#AwesomePeopleHangingOutTogether

(via hummussexual)

“LIFE AND LOVE ON THE NEW YORK CITY SUBWAY” BY STANLEY KUBRICK, 1946

“LIFE AND LOVE ON THE NEW YORK CITY SUBWAY” BY STANLEY KUBRICK, 1946

really, though.

really, though.


El Kef (Al-Kāf‎), also known as Le Kef, is a city in north western Tunisia. It is home to a certain number of Islamic religious edifices, in its role as the center of an important Sufic movement. A symbol of this, the Sidi Bou Makhlouf Mausoleum holds the tomb of the founder of the Aissawa brotherhood in Tunisia, Sidi Bou Makhlouf.

El Kef (Al-Kāf‎), also known as Le Kef, is a city in north western Tunisia. It is home to a certain number of Islamic religious edifices, in its role as the center of an important Sufic movement. A symbol of this, the Sidi Bou Makhlouf Mausoleum holds the tomb of the founder of the Aissawa brotherhood in Tunisia, Sidi Bou Makhlouf.

(via americanserpent)