astronaut-accountant:

Nails matched my coffee mug
Coincidental matching😍

astronaut-accountant:

Nails matched my coffee mug

Coincidental matching😍

put dried sage in your coffee/see your life change before your eyes.

oh my god.

this guy tweeted a collage of some young girls (I’m assuming refugees?) with the caption “<3 ما اقبح الفقر و ما اجمل الفقراء”. every inch of my skin is crawling.

bintrushd:


“We have a French government that is depriving a group of citizens of its democratic rights,” said Youssef Boussoumah, a teacher at a school on the outskirts of Paris, in a community often qualified as a North African “ghetto.”
For Boussoumah, the decision echoes the Parisian police’s infamous crackdown on demonstrations for Algerian independence on Oct. 17, 1961. Police shot what some historians say was well over 200 protesters and buried them in mass graves.
“We are convinced we are seeing a continuity of colonial and racist policies,” said Boussoumah. “My parents were here at the time of the Oct. 17 [Massacre]. I am convinced that while the circumstances are different … the mentality [that precipitated the events] persists.”
The protest ban may result in a larger legal battle to preserve what one lawyer said was the freedom of expression of French Arabs and Muslims.
“We in France see a situation where Islamophobia is gaining ground,” said Hosni Maati, a lawyer who was set to address Paris police hours later to decry what he called “discrimination against our rights as Arabs and Muslims.”
[…]
“It is necessary that we take action to preserve the rights of French citizens,” Maati said.
Sunday’s pro-Palestine rally was significant for France’s Arab and Muslim communities because many economically, politically and socially disenfranchised youth participated, said Boussoumah.
“It was the first protest for many,” he said. “What are we telling them? ‘You are barbarians and anti-Semites, and you are no longer allowed to come out. You are condemned to watch images of Palestine without being able to express your outrage.’”
[…]
Although Boussoumah indicated that he feels disheartened by the Parisian police’s decision, he said he’s hopeful — for Palestine activism and the French Arab and Muslim communities.
“The fact that they are so afraid to see so many Arabs rising up in society is a source of hope. They act on that fear when they take away our democratic rights,” he said.
He explained that in his parents’ generation, French North Africans were only factory workers. Now North Africans have advanced themselves, where possible, in the arts, sports and sometimes politics.
“That unsettles people,” he said. 

Read more

bintrushd:

“We have a French government that is depriving a group of citizens of its democratic rights,” said Youssef Boussoumah, a teacher at a school on the outskirts of Paris, in a community often qualified as a North African “ghetto.”

For Boussoumah, the decision echoes the Parisian police’s infamous crackdown on demonstrations for Algerian independence on Oct. 17, 1961. Police shot what some historians say was well over 200 protesters and buried them in mass graves.

“We are convinced we are seeing a continuity of colonial and racist policies,” said Boussoumah. “My parents were here at the time of the Oct. 17 [Massacre]. I am convinced that while the circumstances are different … the mentality [that precipitated the events] persists.”

The protest ban may result in a larger legal battle to preserve what one lawyer said was the freedom of expression of French Arabs and Muslims.

“We in France see a situation where Islamophobia is gaining ground,” said Hosni Maati, a lawyer who was set to address Paris police hours later to decry what he called “discrimination against our rights as Arabs and Muslims.”

[…]

“It is necessary that we take action to preserve the rights of French citizens,” Maati said.

Sunday’s pro-Palestine rally was significant for France’s Arab and Muslim communities because many economically, politically and socially disenfranchised youth participated, said Boussoumah.

“It was the first protest for many,” he said. “What are we telling them? ‘You are barbarians and anti-Semites, and you are no longer allowed to come out. You are condemned to watch images of Palestine without being able to express your outrage.’”

[…]

Although Boussoumah indicated that he feels disheartened by the Parisian police’s decision, he said he’s hopeful — for Palestine activism and the French Arab and Muslim communities.

“The fact that they are so afraid to see so many Arabs rising up in society is a source of hope. They act on that fear when they take away our democratic rights,” he said.

He explained that in his parents’ generation, French North Africans were only factory workers. Now North Africans have advanced themselves, where possible, in the arts, sports and sometimes politics.

“That unsettles people,” he said. 

Read more

(via rojo-vermelho)

girls who wear hijab while rocking the maxi dress & chunky sneaker look are the truth.

"You will seek her everywhere, my son
You will ask the waves of the sea about her
You will ask the shores of the seas
You will travel the oceans
And your tears will flow like a river
And at the close of your life
You will find that since your beloved
Has no land, no home, no address
You have been pursuing only a trace of smoke
How difficult it is, my son
To love a woman
Who has neither land, nor home"

Nizar Qabbani  (via meh-ran)

(Source: deghkardan, via yungscholar)

GPOY

GPOY

The making of rose water in Iran

(Source: ree-az, via niqabisinparis)

angel-cine:

Kaajal (1965)

angel-cine:

Kaajal (1965)

(via nonsunblob)

noorehh:

how to be my husband

still one of my best snaps to date

noorehh:

how to be my husband

still one of my best snaps to date

I remember one time i was sitting next to this arab guy on the way to jumuaa and usually on this specific train at this specific time the cars are filled with muslims all reading surat al kahf on their phones and I just looked over at his phone just so i could be like ‘yup kahf rite’ and i saw he was listening to the weeknd.

"In an age when it is so common for progressive, cosmopolitan intellectuals (particularly in Europe?) to insist on the near-pathological character of nationalism, its roots in fear and hatred of the Other, and its affinities with racism, it is useful to remind ourselves that nations inspire love, and often profoundly self-sacrificing love. The cultural products of nationalism – poetry, prose fiction, music, plastic arts – show this love very clearly in thousands of different forms and styles […] Even in the case of the colonized people who have every reason to feel hatred towards their imperialist rulers."

Benedict Anderson, Imagined Communities (via lehaaz)

(via yungscholar)

isqineeha:

From Left to Right; Palestinian Poet Mahmoud Darwish, Iraqi Poet Mohammad Mahdi Al Jawahiri, and Palestinian Poet Samih al Qasim - 1969

Darwish tho.

isqineeha:

From Left to Right; Palestinian Poet Mahmoud Darwish, Iraqi Poet Mohammad Mahdi Al Jawahiri, and Palestinian Poet Samih al Qasim - 1969

Darwish tho.

(via mashrou3-ummi)

talldarkarab:

rosyln:

Life in Gaza

Wow

(via musaafer)

plot twist: disenfranchised brown youth in acclaimed indie movie falls for the fine as hell boy/girl next door & resist empire together instead of finding forbidden luv and redemption from average-looking white member of the dominant power.